303D CAVALRY REGIMENT - USAR
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Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A blue garter, circular in form, edged with gold and gold buckle, displaying the motto of the regiment, “TOUJOURS PRET ET AUDACIEUX,” charged with the wings of an old Dutch windmill placed saltirewise in gold and on this a red star piped with gold. The overall dimension is 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in diameter.

Symbolism
The Regiment was originally organized in Texas, as shown by the Lone Star. They served as Artillery during World War I, shown by the red in the star. It was reconstituted as Cavalry in New York City, shown by the windmill. The motto translates to “Always Ready and Fearless.”

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 October 1925. It was rescinded on 2 March 1959.




Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Or, a bend Gules, between in sinister chief a mullet and in dexter base the sails of an old Dutch windmill, both of the like; on a canton Azure, a fess dancetté of two points to chief and one to base Or, overall a chevron Gules and of the field fimbriated of the second (Or), all within a diminished border Sable fimbriated of the fifth (Or).

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

TOUJOURS PRET ET AUDACIEUX (Always Ready and Fearless).

Symbolism

Shield

The Regiment was originally organized in Texas, as shown by the Lone Star; it was then turned into Artillery for the period of the war, shown by the red bend, and reconstituted as Cavalry in New York City, shown by the windmill. The canton is the shield of the 51st Machine Gun Squadron, New York National Guard, old Squadron “A” of New York. More than fifty percent of the 303d Cavalry since its organization were ex-members of Squadron “A” and the 303d Cavalry thus indicates its foster parent.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 24 October 1925. It was rescinded on 2 March 1959.





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