63D ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/32 inches (2.78 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield rounded at bottom and blazoned: Barry of six, Argent and Gules, three piles of the last, that portion over the second, fimbriated of the first. Attached below the shield a Red scroll inscribed “NON SINE INDUSTRIA” in Silver letters.

Symbolism
The scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The construction function of the Battalion is referred to by the heraldic piles symbolic of wedges. The horizontal division lines of the shield, being similar to the heraldic fess, symbolize the military belt or girdle of honor. The numerical designation is indicated by the six horizontal divisions of the shield and the three scarlet piles. The motto alludes to the story of the shield.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 6 March 1943. It was amended to revise the symbolism on 4 November 1969.




Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Barry of six, Argent and Gules, three piles of the last, that portion over the second, fimbriated of the first.

Crest

On a wreath Argent and Gules, upon two tank traps (Dragon’s teeth) conjoined fesswise of the first a dragon passant of the like armed and langued Azure (Celestial) and grasping an antler of four tynes Or, all surmounted in base by a caltrap Sable.

Motto

NON SINE INDUSTRIA (Not Without Industry).

Symbolism

Shield

The scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The construction function of the Battalion is referred to by the heraldic piles symbolic of wedges. The horizontal division lines of the shield, being similar to the heraldic fess, symbolize the military belt or girdle of honor. The numerical designation is indicated by the six horizontal divisions of the shield and the three scarlet piles. The motto alludes to the story of the shield.

Crest

The crest commemorates the Battalion’s combat service in Europe during World War II. The white fortifications are called “dragon’s teeth;” they represent Germany’s wall of defense, the Siegfried Line. The black caltrap is a defensive weapon formerly scattered over battlefields to impede progress. It stands for explosive mines and refers to mine laying and demolition work. The “dragon’s teeth” and caltrap refer specifically to the Battalion’s achievements in forcing an opening in some of the greatest fortifications ever constructed and in clearing mine fields for the advance of the Division’s Armor and Infantry units into enemy territory. The dragon grasping the antler refers to the capture of the strategic city of Sarrebourg in northeastern France. On that occasion men of the Battalion gallantly went into the line as Infantry. “Dragon” is a name formerly applied to a type of musket and later to the Soldier or “dragoon” who carried the musket. The antler grasped by the dragon is from the coat of arms of Sarrebourg, to which the 44th Division advanced over the roadways and bridges constructed by the Battalion.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 6 March 1943. It was amended to add the crest and revise the symbolism on 4 November 1969.





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