314TH CAVALRY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, on a low mount a palmetto tree Vert in chief a five-pointed mullet Gules, all within a diminished bordure of the last. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “UNITY AND SPEED” in Red letters.

Symbolism
The shield is yellow (gold) for Cavalry, the red bordure to represent service during World War I as Artillery. The star is for the State of Texas – the birthplace of the Regiment, while the palmetto tree is taken from the state flag of South Carolina; Camp Jackson being the place of training.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 30 October 1925.




Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Or, on a low mount a palmetto tree Vert in chief a five-pointed mullet Gules, all within a diminished bordure of the last.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

UNITY AND SPEED.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is yellow for Cavalry, the red bordure to represent service during World War I as Artillery. The star is for the State of Texas – the birthplace of the Regiment, while the palmetto tree is taken from the state flag of South Carolina; Camp Jackson being the place of training.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 21 September 1925.





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