146TH CAVALRY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, six fleurs-de-lis one, two and three Or on a chief of the like four piles Gules. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed ďMOUNTED AND READYĒ in Blue letters.

Symbolism
Yellow is for Cavalry. The gold fleurs-de-lis on the blue field are from the arms of the Province of Ile de France where the capitol of France and the departments of Aisne and Oise are located. The fleurs-de-lis refer to the organizationís six campaigns in France in World War I and particularly to the actions in or near the Departments of Aisne and Oise for which the unit was awarded the French Croix de Guerre. The gold upper part of the shield with the scarlet piles represents the Northern Lights, visible from the Aleutian Islands where the organization served in World War II. The piles are four in number in reference to the four main groups of the Islands; they are scarlet for Artillery, the unitís branch of service in both World Wars.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 12 June 1967.




Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Azure, six fleurs-de-lis one, two and three Or on a chief of the like four piles Gules.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Michigan Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Azure, a griffin sergeant Or.

Motto

MOUNTED AND READY.

Symbolism

Shield

Yellow is for Cavalry. The gold fleurs-de-lis on the blue field are from the arms of the Province of Ile de France where the capitol of France and the departments of Aisne and Oise are located. The fleurs-de-lis refer to the organizationís six campaigns in France in World War I and particularly to the actions in or near the Departments of Aisne and Oise for which the unit was awarded the French Croix de Guerre. The gold upper part of the shield with the scarlet piles represents the Northern Lights, visible from the Aleutian Islands where the organization served in World War II. The piles are four in number in reference to the four main groups of the Islands; they are scarlet for Artillery, the unitís branch of service in both World Wars.

Crest

The crest is that of the Michigan Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 25 May 1966.





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