96TH TRANSPORTATION BATTALION
Skip Navigation Links.
Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per bend Or and Gules (Brick Red) a transmission main shaft assembly bendwise counterchanged. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “HERE TO SERVE” in Brick Red letters.

Symbolism
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors used for Transportation Corps. The transmission main shaft assembly, representing all motor vehicles, is symbolic of the mission of the unit to give superior mobility for military personnel, weapons and supplies to organizations, activities and operations.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 December 1959.




Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Per bend Or and Gules (Brick Red) a transmission main shaft assembly bendwise counterchanged.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules (Brick Red), the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor) stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

HERE TO SERVE.

Symbolism

Shield

Brick red and golden yellow are the colors used for Transportation Corps. The transmission main shaft assembly, representing all motor vehicles, is symbolic of the mission of the unit to give superior mobility for military personnel, weapons and supplies to organizations, activities and operations.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 23 December 1959.





Jump to Top