67TH AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, a chevron vaire Or and Vert, in dexter chief a crescent of the second. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “MEMOR ET FIDELIS” in Red letters.

Symbolism
The shield is red for Artillery. The chevron is taken from the arms of General James Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony of Georgia, and the crescent is taken from the flag displayed on the fort in South Carolina by Colonel Moultrie. The motto translates to “Mindful and Faithful.”

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 67th Coast Artillery (Antiaircraft) Regiment on 3 March 1931. It was redesignated for the 67th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 7 August 1956. It was amended to add the motto on 2 October 1957. It was redesignated for the 67th Artillery Regiment on 2 January 1959. The insignia was redesignated for the 67th Air Defense Artillery Regiment on 1 September 1971.




Coat of Arms

Coat Of Arms

Blazon

Shield

Gules, a chevron vaire Or and Vert, in dexter chief a crescent of the second.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules seven bird-bolts points to chief six in saltire, three and three and one in pale Vert barbed, flighted and banded Argent surmounted by a Roman shield of the second bearing a cross paty Gold within a border Silver.

Motto

MEMOR ET FIDELIS (Mindful and Faithful).

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is red for Artillery. The chevron is taken from the arms of General James Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony of Georgia, and the crescent is taken from the flag displayed on the fort in South Carolina by Colonel Moultrie.

Crest

The Roman shield bearing the cross which is taken from the coat of arms of Rome refers to the organization’s service in Italy for which an element of the Regiment was awarded the French Croix de Guerre with Palm embroidered “Road to Rome.” The bird-bolts, a type of arrow used to bring down birds, allude to the Antiaircraft designation of the organization during World War II. The bolts are seven in number in reference to the seven campaigns in which the unit participated. Red and green allude to the colors of the French Croix de Guerre; and red, white and green to the national colors of Italy.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 67th Coast Artillery (Antiaircraft) Regiment on 2 March 1931. It was redesignated for the 67th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion on 12 January 1945. It was redesignated for the 67th Antiaircraft Artillery battalion on 7 August 1956. It was redesignated for the 67th Artillery Regiment on 2 January 1959. It was amended to add a crest on 9 May 1966. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 27 January 1969. The insignia was redesignated for the 67th Air Defense Artillery Regiment on 1 September 1971.





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