389TH ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall issuing from within a black spade iron, a blue fleur-de-lis. Arched and attached above the device a gold scroll inscribed "DOWN TO EARTH" in black letters.

Symbolism
The fleur-de-lis symbolizes France. The spade iron, an ancient heraldic symbol used as a reinforcement of a wooden spade, refers to digging and thus construction.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 1 February 1965. It was amended to change the base metal from silver to gold on 18 May 1977.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gules two chevrons Argent a pale of the like; in pale a fleur-de-lis Azure, issuing from within a spade iron Sable.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor) stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

DOWN TO EARTH.

Symbolism

Shield

Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Corps of Engineers. The pale in the center of the shield represents Central Europe and further refers to the Rhineland (Rhine River) which, together with the fleur-de-lis symbolizing France, alludes to the areas in which the Battalion fought in World War II. The four branches formed by the pale and two chevrons represent the Battalion's four battle honors. The spade iron, an ancient heraldic symbol, used as a reinforcement of a wooden spade refers to digging and thus construction.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 15 December 1964.





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