131ST INFANTRY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, a closet between two wavy barrulets, surmounted by a pairle, Argent; overall the old insignia of the First Regiment of Infantry, Illinois National Guard, (wheel within a diamond) Proper; in chief four fleurs-de-lis, three and one, of the second. Attached above the shield on a wreath, upon a grassy field the blockhouse of old Fort Dearborn, all Silver Gray. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "DUCIT AMOR PATRIAE" in Blue letters.

Symbolism
The shield is blue ? the present Infantry color, and the main charges are silver or white ? the old Infantry facing color. The pairle is taken from the Chicago seal: the first wavy barrulets represents Spanish-American War service, the closet Mexican Border duty, and the second wavy barrulets the second time the organization was in Federal service overseas. The four fleurs-de-lis represent the engagements during World War I. The charge in the fess point is the insignia of the old First Regiment of Infantry, Illinois National Guard. The motto translates to "Led By Love Of Country."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved for the 131st Infantry Regiment on 19 April 1927.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Azure, a closet between two wavy barrulets, surmounted by a pairle, Argent; overall the old insignia of the First Regiment of Infantry, Illinois National Guard, (wheel within a diamond) Proper; in chief four fleurs-de-lis, three and one, of the second.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Illinois Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, upon a grassy field the blockhouse of old Fort Dearborn Proper.

Motto

DUCIT AMOR PATRIAE (Led By Love Of Country).

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is blue ? the present Infantry color, and the main charges are silver or white ? the old Infantry facing color. The pairle is taken from the Chicago seal: the first wavy barrulets represents Spanish-American War service, the closet Mexican Border duty, and the second wavy barrulets the second time the organization was in Federal service overseas. The four fleurs-de-lis represent the engagements during World War I. The charge in the fess point is the insignia of the old First Regiment of Infantry, Illinois National Guard.

Crest

The crest is that of the Illinois Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 19 April 1927.





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