132D SUPPORT BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess Gules and Azure on a pile reversed between two piles Or a torteau. Attached below the shield a three segmented Red scroll inscribed "SUPPLY on the dexter segment, "SERVICE" on the center segment and "SUPPORT" on the sinister segment all in Gold color metal letters.

Symbolism
Scarlet is the color used for Support Battalions. The pile is symbolic of support and refers to the basic mission of the organization. The red area silhouetted between the upper two piles and point of the lower pile simulates a red arrowhead and alludes to the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 32d Infantry Brigade of which the organization is a part. Furthermore, the lower pile simulates a mountain and together with the disk resembling a hole refers to Wisconsin's sobriquet, the Badger State. The term was applied to the early lead miners, who, first coming to a new location, dug in the side of a hill and lived under ground much as the badger digs in his burrow.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 10 July 1969.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per fess Gules and Azure on a pile reversed between two piles Or a torteau.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Wisconsin Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules a badger couchant Proper.

Motto

SUPPLY SERVICE SUPPORT.

Symbolism

Shield

Scarlet is the color used for Support Battalions. The pile is symbolic of support and refers to the basic mission of the organization. The red area silhouetted between the upper two piles and point of the lower pile simulates a red arrowhead and alludes to the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 32d Infantry Brigade of which the organization is a part. Furthermore, the lower pile simulates a mountain and together with the disk resembling a hole refers to Wisconsin's sobriquet, the Badger State. The term was applied to the early lead miners, who, first coming to a new location, dug in the side of a hill and lived under ground much as the badger digs in his burrow.

Crest

The crest is that of the Wisconsin Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 15 April 1969.





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