141ST INFANTRY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per pale Argent and Gules, a fleur-de-lis Azure and the badge of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, during the Spanish-American War, Proper fimbriated of the first on a chief dancetté of the third a mullet of the fifth. Attached above the shield on a wreath Argent and Gules, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Blue scroll inscribed "REMEMBER THE ALAMO" in Silver letters.

Symbolism
The colors of the shield are white, red and blue, and with the mullet allude to the flag of the Texas Republic, under which Company A, the oldest unit, was first organized. The badge on the sinister side of the shield represents the Cuban Occupation service of the 141st Infantry, Texas National Guard. The fleur-de-lis represents World War I service. The crest is that of the Texas Army National Guard.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 3 March 1931. It was amended to correct the wording in the blazon of the shield on 11 March 1931. It was amended to add the crest of the Texas Army National Guard on 22 January 1969.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per pale Argent and Gules, a fleur-de-lis Azure and the badge of the 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, during the Spanish-American War, Proper fimbriated of the first; on a chief dancetté of the third a mullet of the fifth.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Texas Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper.

Motto

REMEMBER THE ALAMO.

Symbolism

Shield

The colors of the shield are white, red and blue, and with the mullet allude to the flag of the Texas Republic, under which Company A, the oldest unit, was first organized. The badge on the sinister side of the shield represents the Cuban Occupation service of the 141st Infantry, Texas National Guard. The fleur-de-lis represents World War I service.

Crest

The crest is that of the Texas Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 5 March 1931. It was amended to correct the blazon of the shield on 11 March 1931.





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