387TH MILITARY POLICE BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a shield blazoned: Vert, a mullet with its points terminating in balls Or charged with a fleur-de-lis of the field. Attached below and to the sides of the shield is a Gold scroll inscribed "TOUJOURS EN VEDETTE" in Green letters.

Symbolism
The colors green and yellow are those used for Military Police organizations. The star is a representation of the customary badge of U.S. Marshals and Sheriffs in the days of the vigilante and the Old West; and is symbolic of vigilance, law and order attributes of the Military Police. The fleur-de-lis represents service in France and the place in which the Battalion was originally constituted. The motto translates to "Always Alert."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 19 February 1952.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Vert, a mullet with its points terminating in balls Or charged with a fleur-de-lis of the field.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

TOUJOURS EN VEDETTE (Always Alert).

Symbolism

Shield

The colors green and yellow are those used for Military Police organizations. The star is a representation of the customary badge of U.S. Marshals and Sheriffs in the days of the vigilante and the Old West; and is symbolic of vigilance, law and order attributes of the Military Police. The fleur-de-lis represents service in France and the place in which the Battalion was originally constituted.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 19 February 1952.





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