142D INFANTRY REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, a fess wavy Gules fimbriated Argent, issuant in chief the shell-torn church steeple at St. Etienne, France, of the third. Above the shield on a wreath Argent and Azure, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of like oak and olive Proper. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Blue scroll inscribed "I'LL FACE YOU" in Silver letters.

Symbolism
The shield is blue for Infantry. The wavy fess symbolizes the Aisne River where the Regiment's outstanding achievements took place during World War I; it also symbolizes the Red River separating the States of Texas and Oklahoma, from which states were drawn the units composing the 142d Infantry, Texas Army National Guard - the 7th Texas and Machine Gun Company. The church at St. Etienne, France, was in the sector where the Regiment received its baptism of fire.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 27 June 1928. It was amended to add the crest of the Texas Army National Guard on 22 January 1969.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Azure, a fess wavy Gules fimbriated Argent, issuant in chief the shell-torn church steeple at St. Etienne, France, of the third.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Texas Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper.

Motto

I'LL FACE YOU.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is blue for Infantry. The wavy fess symbolizes the Aisne River where the Regiment's outstanding achievements took place during World War I; it also symbolizes the Red River separating the States of Texas and Oklahoma, from which states were drawn the units composing the 142d Infantry, Texas Army National Guard - the 7th Texas and Machine Gun Company. The church at St. Etienne, France, was in the sector where the Regiment received its baptism of fire. First Lieutenant Donald J. McLennan, D.S.C., scout officer of the 1st Battalion, 142nd Regiment Infantry, led a patrol across the Aisne River into the enemy country on October 8, 1918 and secured information of vast importance to the Regiment. As he returned, under heavy fire, to the south bank of the Aisne River with his patrol, he was the last man to cross and would not cross with his back to the enemy. Instead, he backed across the foot-log, shaking his fist and shouting to the enemy "We're going back, but I'll face you."

Crest

The crest is that of the Texas Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 27 June 1928.





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