210TH ARMOR REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall blazoned: Argent, a bend Azure, overall in fess point the badge of the Regiment of 1870 Proper (a White cross patée with rectangular openings between the arms, the badge of the 2d Division, XIX Army Corps, Civil War, charged with a Gold bugle with the Arabic numeral "10" in the opening, the Infantry device of the Civil War period) between in sinister chief a taro leaf stem down Vert and in dexter base a fleur-de-lis of the second. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "DUCIT AMOR PATRIAE" in Blue letters.

Symbolism
The shield is white, the color of the old Infantry facings. The cross was worn as a badge during the Civil War. The taro leaf indicates service in Hawaii, while the fleur-de-lis represents service in World War I. The motto translates to "Led By Love Of Country."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 10th Infantry Regiment on 19 June 1926. It was amended to change the wording of the description on 5 February 1927. It was redesignated for the 106th Infantry Regiment on 6 January 1941. The insignia was redesignated for the 106th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 8 December 1950. It was redesignated for the 127th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 23 February 1954. It was redesignated for the 127th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 6 June 1955. The insignia was redesignated for the 210th Armor Regiment on 26 March 1962. It was amended to add a motto on 30 August 1968. It was amended to include a description on 13 October 1989.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Argent, a bend Azure, overall in fess point the badge of the Regiment of 1870 Proper (a White cross patée with rectangular openings between the arms, the badge of the 2d Division, XIX Army Corps, Civil War, charged with a Gold bugle with the Arabic numeral "10" in the opening, the Infantry device of the Civil War period) between in sinister chief a taro leaf stem down Vert and in dexter base a fleur-de-lis of the second.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the New York Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, the full-rigged ship "Half Moon" all Proper.

Motto

DUCIT AMOR PATRIAE (Led By Love Of Country).

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is white, the color of the old Infantry facings. The cross was worn as a badge during the Civil War. The light blue bend and the placement of the numeral "on the bend" of the bugle (as prescribed for Infantry during the Civil War) allude to the origin of the organization. The taro leaf indicates service in Hawaii, and the fleur-de-lis represents service in World War I.

Crest

The crest is that of the New York Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 10th Infantry Regiment on 3 November 1923. It was amended to change the wording of the blazon and symbolism of the shield on 19 June 1926. It was amended to change the wording of the blazon of the shield on 5 February 1927. The previous amendment of the blazon and symbolism was cancelled on 7 March 1931. It was amended to correct the wording of the symbolism on 28 April 1931. It was redesignated for the 106th Infantry Regiment on 6 January 1941. The insignia was redesignated for the 106th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 8 December 1950. It was redesignated for the 127th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 23 February 1954. It was redesignated for the 127th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 6 June 1955. The insignia was redesignated for the 210th Armor Regiment on 26 March 1962.





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