140TH SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 5/32 inches (2.94 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, on a bend between in dexter chief a sea lion holding in dexter paw a sword and in sinister base a bar dancette couped Or, five fleurs-de-lis paleways Azure. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed "REMEMBER THE MISSION" in Blue letters.

Symbolism
The colors scarlet and yellow are used for Artillery. The five fleurs-de-lis on the diagonal band symbolize the unit's World War I campaign awards. The sea lion, from the coat of arms of Manila, represents service in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and the Philippine Presidential Unit award. The jagged bar with three peaks indicates the three assault landings in the European Theater during World War II. The peaks also refer to the mountainous terrain of Colorado, the home area of the Battalion.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 137th Field Artillery Battalion on 27 June 1956. It was redesignated for the 140th Signal Battalion on 17 May 1963.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gules, on a bend between in dexter chief a sea lion holding in dexter paw a sword and in sinister base a bar dancette couped Or, five fleurs-de-lis paleways Azure.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Colorado Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules, a fasces paleways Proper with ribbon Red, White, and Blue.

Motto

REMEMBER THE MISSION.

Symbolism

Shield

The colors scarlet and yellow are used for Artillery. The five fleurs-de-lis on the diagonal band symbolize the unit's World War I campaign awards. The sea lion, from the coat of arms of Manila, represents service in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II and the Philippine Presidential Unit award. The jagged bar with three peaks indicates the three assault landings in the European Theater during World War II. The peaks also refer to the mountainous terrain of Colorado, the home area of the Battalion.

Crest

The crest is that of the Colorado Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 137th Field Artillery Battalion on 27 June 1956. It was redesignated for the 140th Signal Battalion on 17 May 1963.





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