149TH ARMOR REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, chain mail Vert, in chief a prickly pear cactus of the last and a fleur-de-lis Gules and in base a carabao affronté Sable. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Black scroll turned Gold inscribed "MEN AND STEEL" in Gold letters.

Symbolism
Yellow and green are the colors for Armor. The cactus symbolizes Mexican Border service and the fleur-de-lis, service in World War I. The carabao, a beast of burden often used for transportation, is common in the Philippines and represents World War II service in that country. The chain mail?a kind of armor used by warriors in ancient times?signifies the type of organization.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 149th Tank Battalion on 21 May 1953. It was redesignated for the 149th Armor Regiment on 23 February 1961.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Or, chain mail Vert, in chief a prickly pear cactus of the last and a fleur-de-lis Gules and in base a carabao affronté Sable.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the California Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert, the setting sun behind a grizzly bear passant on a grassy field all Proper.

Motto

MEN AND STEEL.

Symbolism

Shield

Yellow and green are the colors for Armor. The cactus symbolizes Mexican Border service and the fleur-de-lis, service in World War I. The carabao, a beast of burden often used for transportation, is common in the Philippines and represents World War II service in that country. The chain mail?a kind of armor used by warriors in ancient times?signifies the type of organization.

Crest

The crest is that of the California Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 149th Tank Battalion on 21 May 1953. It was redesignated for the 149th Armor Regiment on 23 February 1961.





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