410TH CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, on a pale Sable, a sword of the first, point downward, superimposed on the blade an unfurled scroll Argent surmounted by a quill pen bend-sinisterwise of the first; on a chief of the second, a stylized mountain range Brün, below a mullet of the third. Attached below the device, a Black scroll inscribed "ORDO AB CHAO" in Silver letters.

Symbolism
Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs. The pale denotes fortitude. The sword, its point down, symbolizes unit responsibility to administer justice to overcome chaos. The unfurled scroll and quill signify the mission of civil authority. Black and gold, the colors of the shield, suggest chaos and order. The mountain range alludes to the Franklin Mountains of El Paso, Texas, with the star (as shown on the Texas flag), illustrates the origin of the Battalion. The motto translates to "Out of Chaos Comes Order."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved effective 16 September 2011.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Or, on a pale Sable, a sword of the first, point downward, superimposed on the blade, an unfurled scroll Argent surmounted by a quill pen bend-sinisterwise of the first; on a chief of the second, a stylized mountain range Brün, in chief a mullet of the third.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Sable, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

ORDO AB CHAO (Out of Chaos Comes Order).

Symbolism

Shield

Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs. The pale denotes fortitude. The sword, its point down, symbolizes unit responsibility to administer justice to overcome chaos. The unfurled scroll and quill signify the mission of civil authority. Black and gold, the colors of the shield, suggest chaos and order. The mountain range alludes to the Franklin Mountains of El Paso, Texas, with the star (as shown on the Texas flag), illustrates the origin of the Battalion.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved effective 16 September 2011.





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