439TH MEDICAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Argent, a cross quartered Sanguine and Gules between four cups Azure, overall a fleur-de-lis Or. Attached at the bottom of the shield and on either side, a tripartite maroon scroll doubled and inscribed "DUTY SERVICE HONOR" in Silver.

Symbolism
Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with Army Medical units. Gold is for excellence and achievement; red signifies vitality and courage. White represents purity and integrity; blue suggests loyalty. The cross denotes medicine and compassion. The fleur-de-lis reflects service in France during World War II. The cups allude to assistance in times of distress and giving relief. Red, white, and blue are adapted from the state flag of Tennessee, home base of the unit.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 3 May 1994.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Argent, a cross quartered Sanguine and Gules between four cups Azure, overall a fleur-de-lis Or.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Argent and Sanguine, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

DUTY SERVICE HONOR.

Symbolism

Shield

Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with Army Medical units. Gold is for excellence and achievement; red signifies vitality and courage. White represents purity and integrity; blue suggests loyalty. The cross denotes medicine and compassion. The fleur-de-lis reflects service in France during World War II. The cups allude to assistance in times of distress and giving relief. Red, white, and blue are adapted from the state flag of Tennessee, home base of the unit.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 3 May 1994.





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