94TH MILITARY POLICE BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A silver color metal and enamel device 1 5/16 inches (3.33 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver demi-bear collared with a silver cord, pendant therefrom a red and blue Taeguk, holding in his right paw a silver banner, the upper half extended to form a streamer, charged with a black cross throughout, all above a black scroll inscribed "WHEN IN NEED" in silver letters.

Symbolism
The bear, honored in Korea as the progenitor of the Korean race, and the red and blue Taeguk, emblem of the country, commemorate the organization's two Korean unit decorations. The silver flag with the long streamer, a German type of banner called a "Schwenkel," is charged with a black cross from the arms of the city of Bonn, capital of the Federal Republic of Germany, in reference to the reactivation of the Battalion in Germany in 1959.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 6 May 1966.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Vert, in pairle reversed three chains throughout Or overall a bezant engrailed of eight points bearing a Korea Taeguk (Gules and Azure) in canton a fleur-de-lis of the second.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert, a demi-bear Argent collared with a wreath of three twists Gules, Azure and Gules, grasping in his dexter claw two palm branches of the third and holding palewise a staff with banner flotant of the like charged with a cross throughout Sable.

Motto

WHEN IN NEED.

Symbolism

Shield

The three chains represent control and refer to the Military Police function; they also allude to the Battalion's three years service in Korea during the Korean War, the red and blue Korean Taeguk on the roundel of eight points alluding to the eight Korean campaigns in which the unit participated. The fleur-de-lis alludes to the activation of the Battalion in Paris, France.

Crest

The design commemorates the organization's two Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations. They are represented by the two branches of palm held by the bear, honored in Korea as the progenitor of the Korean race. The red and blue of the wreath combined with the white of the bear allude to the colors of the Korean National Flag. The banner with the long streamer (a German type of banner called a "Schwenkel") bears the cross from the arms of the city of Bonn, capital of the Federal Republic of Germany, in reference to the reactivation of the Battalion in Germany in 1959.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 19 October 1973.





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