418TH REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Gold color metal and enamel device consisting of a rounded shield shape blazoned as follows: Azure, an Indian's head in profile couped at the shoulder, two feathers in hair, hair tied with wampum, red blanket on shoulder; within a wreath of two rattlesnakes, all Proper. Attached below and to the sides a Gold scroll inscribed "SEMPER PUGNARE PARATUS" in Blue letters.

Symbolism
The charges allude to the history of the geographical area to which the organization was allotted originally. The use of the warrior's head and the rattlesnakes was suggested by Orcutt's History, published under the auspices of the Fairfield County (Connecticut) Historical Society. "The first of the Indian Wars in Connecticut was the Pequot War which began in May 1639, in a swamp flat which is now in the village of Southport in the Town of Fairfield. There were at the time in the Housatonic River Valley from Long Island Sound Northward, between two and three thousand Indians. Five plantations were seriously in danger, Stratford, Fairfield, Norwalk, Stamford, and Greenwich. In this year and several following, the actions of the Indians in what is now Fairfield County were such as to awaken great apprehension for the safety of the people." The rattlesnake?harmless when undisturbed but dangerous when provoked?is a symbol associated with the New England patriotism. The blue of the shield represents Infantry. The motto translates to "Always Ready To Fight."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 418th Infantry Regiment on 6 December 1926. It was redesignated for the 418th Regiment on 19 February 1960.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Azure, an Indian's head in profile couped at the shoulder, two feathers in hair, hair tied with wampum, red blanket on shoulder; within a wreath of two rattlesnakes, all Proper.

Crest

That for regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Or and Azure the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

SEMPER PUGNARE PARATUS (Always Ready To Fight).

Symbolism

Shield

The charges allude to the history of the geographical area to which the organization was allotted originally. The use of the warrior's head and the rattlesnakes was suggested by Orcutt's History, published under the auspices of the Fairfield County (Connecticut) Historical Society. "The first of the Indian Wars in Connecticut was the Pequot War which began in May 1639, in a swamp flat which is now in the village of Southport in the Town of Fairfield. There were at the time in the Housatonic River Valley from Long Island Sound Northward, between two and three thousand Indians. Five plantations were seriously in danger, Stratford, Fairfield, Norwalk, Stamford, and Greenwich. In this year and several following, the actions of the Indians in what is now Fairfield County were such as to awaken great apprehension for the safety of the people." The rattlesnake?harmless when undisturbed but dangerous when provoked?is a symbol associated with the New England patriotism. The blue of the shield represents Infantry.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 418th Infantry Regiment on 21 April 1925. It was redesignated for the 418th Regiment on 19 February 1960.





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