39TH ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/32 inches (2.78 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, on a mount issuant from base a gigantic ox statant affronté Argent charged on the forehead with a mullet of the field, all within a bordure of the second. Attached below and to the sides of the shield is a Red scroll inscribed "FIGHT, BUILD AND DESTROY" in Silver letters.

Symbolism
The shield is the coat of arms approved for the 39th Engineer Combat Regiment, differenced by a border to indicate the descent of the 39th Engineer Battalion from the 2d Battalion of that Regiment. Scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The ox represents Paul Bunyon's ox, "Babe," whose gargantuan performances are symbolic of the functions of the Battalion. Babe was of such gigantic size that he drank large lakes dry; his horns measured six miles across from tip to tip; and his walking through the forests made splendid roads, clearing the trees and brush. The star on the forehead of the ox alludes to Texas, the state in which the Battalion was activated.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 25 May 1955.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gules, on a mount issuant from base a gigantic ox statant affronté Argent charged on the forehead with a mullet of the field, all within a bordure of the second.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules a mound Vert and thereon a tower of the first charged with an arrowhead point up of the second all in front of a European (halberd) and an Oriental (magari-yari) pole arm in saltire all Or.

Motto

FIGHT, BUILD AND DESTROY.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is the coat of arms approved for the 39th Engineer Combat Regiment, differenced by a border to indicate the descent of the 39th Engineer Battalion from the 2d Battalion of that Regiment. Scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The ox represents Paul Bunyon's ox, "Babe," whose gargantuan performances are symbolic of the functions of the Battalion. Babe was of such gigantic size that he drank large lakes dry; his horns measured six miles across from tip to tip; and his walking through the forests made splendid roads, clearing the trees and brush. The star on the forehead of the ox alludes to Texas, the state in which the Battalion was activated.

Crest

The halberd is used to refer to Europe and the magari-yari to Asia; together they allude to the unit's World War II and Vietnam service. The colors red, white and green refer to the National Colors of Italy where the organization participated in six campaigns. The tower represents fortifications; the arrowhead, the assault landing at Sicily; and the color red, the award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation. Gold and red refer to the colors of the Republic of Vietnam where the unit participated in twelve campaigns and received two Meritorious Unit Commendations.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 25 May 1955. It was amended to add a crest on 18 January 1973.





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