1249TH ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Argent, a pile Gules between two ermine spots, and on a chevron counterchanged a bayonet fesswise of the second. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "ONE STEP BETTER" in Black letters.

Symbolism
Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Corps of Engineers. The bayonet and chevron allude to the unit's mission to provide engineer combat support. The chevron simulates a mountain peak symbolizing Mount Hood, and other natural wonders of the Cascade Mountains all in the area of the 1249th Engineer Battalion headquarters at Salem, Oregon. The ermine spots further symbolize Oregon, known since the early fur trading days as "The Beaver State."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 19 February 1974.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Argent, a pile Gules between two ermine spots, and on a chevron counterchanged a bayonet fesswise of the second.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Oregon Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a demi-disc Gules charged with the setting sun with twelve light rays Or (the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 41st Division), behind a beaver sejant Proper.

Motto

ONE STEP BETTER.

Symbolism

Shield

Scarlet and white are the colors used for the Corps of Engineers. The bayonet and chevron allude to the unit's mission to provide engineer combat support. The chevron simulates a mountain peak symbolizing Mount Hood, and other natural wonders of the Cascade Mountains all in the area of the 1249th Engineer Battalion headquarters at Salem, Oregon. The ermine spots further symbolize Oregon, known since the early fur trading days as "The Beaver State."

Crest

The crest is that of the Oregon Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 1 November 1973.





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