DELAWARE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD ELEMENT, JOINT FORCE HEADQUARTERS
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Shoulder Sleeve Insignia


Description/Blazon
On a Pale Blue oval background 2 1/16 inches (5.24 cm) in height and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in width with long axis horizontal, the crest of the Delaware Army National Guard Proper: From a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a griffin’s head erased Azure eared and beaked Or langued of the second collared Sable fimbriated of the first and thereon three plates.

Symbolism
The blue griffin's head ''erased'' was the device of Lord De la Warre for whom Delaware River, Delaware Bay, the colony of Delaware and the State of Delaware were named. The black, silver (white) edged bar (collar) with three silver (white) discs are from the coat of arms of William Penn to whom the colony of Delaware was granted in 1682 and which was under the jurisdiction of the colony of Pennsylvania until 1701 when Penn agreed to a separate Delaware assembly. (The griffin's head in being torn off from the rest of the body may, in this instance, be taken as an indication of that event). The wreath in the red and white colors of England refers to the English colonization of Delaware.

Background
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Delaware National Guard on 12 February 1948. It was redesignated for Headquarters, State Area Command, Delaware Army National Guard on 30 December 1983. The insignia was redesignated for the Delaware Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description and add a symbolism effective 1 October 2003. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-476)




Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of the authorized crest for the Delaware Army National Guard: On a wreath of six twists alternating silver and red, a blue griffin's head erased with yellow ears and beak and red tongue with black collar with silver rims and bearing three silver discs. The insignia is worn in pairs.

Symbolism
The blue griffin's head ''erased'' was the device of Lord De la Warre for whom Delaware River, Delaware Bay, the colony of Delaware and the State of Delaware were named. The black, silver edged bar (collar) with three silver discs are from the coat of arms of William Penn to whom the colony of Delaware was granted in 1682 and which was under the jurisdiction of the colony of Pennsylvania until 1701 when Penn agreed to a separate Delaware assembly. (The griffin's head in being torn off from the rest of the body may, in this instance, be taken as an indication of that event). The wreath in the red and white colors of England refers to the English colonization of Delaware.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and noncolor bearing units of the Delaware Army National Guard on 24 February 1971. It was redesignated effective 30 December 1983, for Headquarters, State Area Command, Delaware Army National Guard. The insignia was redesignated for the Delaware Army National Guard Element, Joint Force Headquarters and amended to update the description effective 1 October 2003.




Crest


Description/Blazon
That for regiments and separate battalions of the Delaware Army National Guard: From a wreath of colors, a griffin's head erased Azure eared and beaked Or langued Gules collared Sable fimbriated Argent and thereon three plates.

Symbolism
A griffin was the device of Lord De la Warre and the three white discs are from the arms of William Penn.

Background
The crest was approved for color bearing organizations of the State of Delaware on 6 April 1922.





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