119TH SUPPORT BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a crimson heraldic fusil with crimson flames extending outward from the horizontal points, bearing in the center a gold sun with the eight rays charged with a crimson and blue Taeguk, and enclosing the top and sides of the fusil above the flames a gold lion's head with jagged edges between two gold sprays of laurel leaves, and below, on an encircling tripartite gold scroll, the inscription "WE'LL FIND A WAY" in black letters.

Symbolism
Crimson and yellow (gold) reflect the unit's origin as an Ordnance Battalion. The sprigs of laurel represent World War II and Korean War campaign credit. The eight-rayed sun from the Philippine flag reflects the unit's World War II Presidential Unit Citation. The Taeguk from the flag of South Korea commemorates the Battalion's Meritorious Unit Commendation. The Battalion's organization within the New Jersey Army National Guard is indicated by the lion's head and fusil which also denotes steel for striking fire, and is depicted with flames, referring to the unit's prior maintenance mission.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 30th Ordnance Battalion on 11 October 1967. It was redesignated for the 119th Maintenance Battalion on 28 June 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 119th Support Battalion on 4 April 1996.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Or, a fusil palewise Gules (Crimson) charged with a Philippine sun of the first bearing a Taeguk, between two flames fesswise Gules, on a chief of the second a lion's head erased between two laurel sprigs chevronwise reversed Gold.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the New Jersey Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Gules a lion's head erased Or collared four fusils Gules.

Motto

WE'LL FIND A WAY.

Symbolism

Shield

Crimson and yellow (gold) reflect the unit's origin as an Ordnance Battalion. The sprigs of laurel represent World War II and Korean War campaign credit. The eight-rayed sun from the Philippine flag reflects the unit's World War II Presidential Unit Citation. The Taeguk from the flag of South Korea commemorates the Battalion's Meritorious Unit Commendation. The Battalion's organization within the New Jersey Army National Guard is indicated by the lion's head and fusil which also denotes steel for striking fire, and is depicted with flames, referring to the unit's prior maintenance mission.

Crest

The crest is that of the New Jersey Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 4 April 1996.





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