383D QUARTERMASTER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a vertical light blue grape leaf with gold stem and veins with two gold tendrils issuing left and right entwining the bows of two vertical gold keys, wards outward, and in base the leaf within a continuous black scroll arced at top over the stem and behind the tendrils, overlapping the keys at the sides and passing under the tip of the leaf in base, inscribed on the top "LIFELINE" and in base "OF THE" on the left and "FORCES" on the right, all in gold letters.

Symbolism
Buff (gold) and light blue are the colors used for the Quartermaster Corps. A key is symbolic of authority and stewardship and refers to the overall mission. The two keys are used to represent the organization's service in World War II and the grape leaf represents the unit's participation in the Central Europe campaign. The gold in the stem, veins and tendrils allude to all refined petroleum products and the black scroll to all crude products, and together they reflect the organization's motto.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 9 April 1971.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Celeste, on a pale Buff a grape leaf of the field, between two keys palewise addorsed wards to base Or, the leaf slopped overall of the last and nowed at the key bows.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Celeste, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

LIFELINE OF THE FORCES.

Symbolism

Shield

Buff and light blue are the colors used for the Quartermaster Corps. The keys are symbolic of authority and stewardship and refer to the overall mission. They also represent the organization's service in World War II, while the grape leaf represents the unit's participation in the Central Europe campaign. The gold in the stem, veins and tendrils allude to all refined petroleum products and reflects the organization's motto.

Crest

The crest is that of the U.S. Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 17 January 1997.





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