607TH MILITARY POLICE BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height consisting of a vertical white double-bitted key, the bits at top and the bow in the form of a ball-tipped five-pointed star in white charged on the center with a small green star; the key enclosed by a green scroll twisted in a figure 8 with the lower arc bearing the words "INTEGRITY AND PRIDE" in gold letters.

Symbolism
The key is symbolic of authority and orderliness and signifies a solution to the unknown; a white key is symbolic of discernment. The two bits of the key refer to the unit's mission to provide both provost marshal and military police services. The bow of the key is a five-pointed star, white in reference to the unit's Texas location and ball-tipped in the manner of the traditional lawman's badge. Green and yellow (Gold) are the colors used for the Military Police Corps.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 25 September 1972.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Vert, a double warded key palewise, the wards to chief and its bow as a mullet, void of the field, the points in saltire tipped with plates Argent, between flaunches Or.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Vert, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

INTEGRITY AND PRIDE.

Symbolism

Shield

The key is symbolic of authority and orderliness and signifies a solution to the unknown; a white key is symbolic of discernment. The two bits of the key refer to the unit's mission to provide both provost marshal and military police services. The bow of the key is a five-pointed star, white in reference to the unit's Texas location and ball-tipped in the manner of the traditional lawman's badge. Green and yellow (Gold) are the colors used for the Military Police Corps.

Crest

The crest is that of the U.S. Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 14 April 1996.





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