501ST SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per chevron Argent and Tenné. In base a pelican feather of the first charged with a lightning flash of the second. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "VOX AQUILAE" in Orange letters.

Symbolism
Orange and white are the colors used for the Signal Corps. The lightning flash, representing the function of the company, on the pelican feather, alluding to the state of activation, Louisiana, was the badge of the 101st Airborne Signal Company, the predecessor of the battalion during World War II. The "per chevron" background represents the assault landing in Normandy.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 501st Airborne Signal Battalion on 25 January 1957. It was redesignated for the 501st Signal Battalion on 26 March 1958.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per chevron Argent and Tenné, in base a pelican feather of the first charged with a lightning flash of the second.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors Argent and Tenné an American bald eagle rising wings addorsed Proper armed and langued Gules bearing in dexter talons two arrows saltirewise points up Vert armed Azure and flighted of the fourth.

Motto

VOX AQUILAE (Voice of the Eagle).

Symbolism

Shield

Orange and white are the colors used for the Signal Corps. The lightning flash, representing the function of the company, on the pelican feather, alluding to the state of activation, Louisiana, was the badge of the 101st Airborne Signal Company, the predecessor of the battalion during World War II. The "per chevron" background represents the assault landing in Normandy.

Crest

The two arrowheads refer to the assault landings in Normandy and in the Rhineland and are blue in color in reference to the two Presidential Unit Citations awarded the unit for the Normandy assault and the action at Bastogne during World War II. The green shafts and red feathers allude to the award of the French Croix de Guerre for Normandy and the Belgian Fourragere for Bastogne. Arrows also appear in the Coat of Arms of the Netherlands and refer to the award of the Orange Lanyard. Red also denotes the Meritorious Unit Commendation awarded the unit for service in Vietnam where the organization participated in eight campaigns.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 501st Airborne Signal Battalion on 25 January 1957. It was redesignated for the 501st Signal Battalion on 26 March 1958. The coat of arms was amended to add a crest on 20 September 1974.





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