392D SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, a lion rampant Sable grasping a lightning bolt Tenné, on a fess Azure three fleurs-de-lis of the first. Attached below the shield an orange scroll inscribed "WE SERVE TO HONOR" in gold.

Symbolism
Orange is the primary color used by the Signal Corps; gold is emblematic of honor and high achievement, and blue is for loyalty. Black and gold allude to the night and day, around the clock mission of the Signal Corps. The three fleurs-de-lis commemorate the unit's World War II campaigns in Normandy, Northern France and Ardennes-Alsace, while the lion represents the Central Europe campaign. The lion embodies courage and strength, and the lightning bolt it grasps symbolizes electronic technology and quick response.

Background
The insignia was authorized on 7 Nov 1996.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Or, a lion rampant Sable grasping a lightning bolt Tenné, on a fess Azure three fleurs-de-lis of the first.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Sable, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

WE SERVE TO HONOR.

Symbolism

Shield

Orange is the primary color used by the Signal Corps; gold is emblematic of honor and high achievement, and blue is for loyalty. Black and gold allude to the night and day, around the clock mission of the Signal Corps. The three fleurs-de-lis commemorate the unit's World War II campaigns in Normandy, Northern France and Ardennes-Alsace, while the lion represents the Central Europe campaign. The lion embodies courage and strength, and the lightning bolt it grasps symbolizes electronic technology and quick response.

Crest

The crest is that of the U.S. Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was authorized on 7 Nov 1996.





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