86TH SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess Argent radiant of six from fesspoint two Gules between four Sable and Argent, a tiger face Proper grasping a lightning flash fesswise Tenné within a crescent of the first triple fimbriated Vert, Gules and Sable. Attached below the shield a Red scroll inscribed "FIRST VOICE HEARD" in Silver.

Symbolism
Orange and white (silver) are the colors of the Signal Corps. The rays in chief, suggested by the State flag of Arizona, allude to the battalion's home station, Fort Huachuca. The rays are thirteen in number in reference to the total campaign credits earned in two wars. The two red sectors refer to the battalion's Meritorious Unit Citations, and the black and white rays refer to the knowledge required for night and day signal operations. The tiger symbolizes Vietnam, site of the unit's first wartime service. The lightning bolt connotes electronic communications and speed of response. The crescent, outlined in the colors of the Kuwait flag, represents the Persian Gulf region, site of the unit's second wartime service.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was authorized on 20 June 1966. The first design of the insignia was rescinded and a new design authorized on 27 August 1996. The distinctive unit insignia was amended to correct the description on 7 December 2001.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per fess Argent radiant of six from fesspoint two Gules between Sable and Argent, a tiger face Proper grasping a lightning flash fesswise Tenné within a crescent of the first triple fimbriated Vert, Gules and Sable.

Crest

From a wreath Argent and Sable an octagon Sable fimbriated Argent surmounted by an irregular mullet of six in dexter chief issuing six contrails arcing to sinister base of the second.

Motto

FIRST VOICE HEARD.

Symbolism

Shield

Orange and white are the colors of the Signal Corps. The rays in chief, suggested by the State flag of Arizona, allude to the battalion's home station, Fort Huachuca. The rays are thirteen in number in reference to the total campaign credits earned in two wars. The two red sectors refer to the battalion's Meritorious Unit Citations, and the black and white rays refer to the knowledge required for night and day signal operations. The tiger symbolizes Vietnam, site of the unit's first wartime service. The lightning bolt connotes electronic communications and speed of response. The crescent, outlined in the colors of the Kuwait flag, represents the Persian Gulf region, site of the unit's second wartime service.

Crest

The meteor streaking across the octagon symbolizes swiftness. Its brilliance and speed refer to early methods of conveying information by means of signal lights and stands for the battalion's mission of providing military communications. The eight sides of the insignia, for the eight directions of the compass, indicate that the unit can transmit information in all directions. The eight sides combined with the six points of the meteor also allude to the battalion's numerical designation.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 12 January 1995. The first design was rescinded and a new design authorized on 30 August 1995. The coat of arms was amended to correct the blazon of the shield on 7 December 2001.





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