78TH SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall, consisting of a stylized silver Philippine sun superimposed by a silver and orange lightning flash crossed diagonally, overall a lozenge divided crosswise silver and orange bearing another lozenge divided crosswise orange and silver; at top an arced silver scroll inscribed "NEVER" and at bottom an arced silver scroll inscribed "BETTERED," all in black letters and overall at center a gold sea lion.

Symbolism
Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The flashes and lozenges in alternating colors refer to versatility, multiple capabilities and the unit's heritage of circuit patching and switching. The gold sea lion and Philippine sun, adapted from the seal of the President of the Philippines, commemorate the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded to the Battalion for service in World War II. The sea lion also alludes to Manila and refers to campaign participation at Luzon.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 8 February 1968. It was amended to revise the description and symbolism on 15 June 1992.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per cross Tenné and Argent, a fret containing and interlaced with an annulet, the saltire bands terminating in flashes throughout all counterchanged.

Crest

On a wreath of colors, Argent and Tenné, a sea lion naiant Or, langued Azure, supporting an equilateral triangle point up Azure, charged with a sun rayonnant with eight groups of rays of the third.

Motto

NEVER BETTERED.

Symbolism

Shield

Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The four divisions of the shield denote the unit's heritage of installing, operating, and maintaining four area signal centers as part of an Army area signal system. The fret with flashes depicts the radio relay and field cable trunk circuits between the area signal centers. The interlaced ring alludes to the message center and signal information provided by the organization. The counterchanged colors refer to the signal displacement capability and also the circuit patching and switching responsibilities.

Crest

The gold sea lion and eight-rayed Philippine sun with blue background, from the Seal of the President of the Philippines, refer to the decoration earned by the unit, the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The triangle is taken from the Presidential Seal and the National Flag of the Philippines. The sea lion, also represented on the coat of arms of Manila, additionally refers to campaign participation at Luzon.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 13 December 1967. It was amended to revise the blazon and symbolism on 15 June 1992.





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