58TH SIGNAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall, consisting of a shield blazoned: Per chevron reversed Tenné and Sable, issuant in base between two fountains a splice of three wires spread at fess point per chevron reversed and per pale throughout, in chief issuant from fess point to chief Argent. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "SPIRIT SPEED STRENGTH" in Black letters.

Symbolism
Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The two fountains (white and blue wavy discs) in base denote the unit's participation in two Pacific campaigns during World War II. The spliced wires suggest the Battalion's particular function of cable construction, and crossing the black into the bright orange signifies the light of information brought by communications. The two flashes are representative of signals.

Background
A distinctive unit insignia was approved on 26 November 1941. That design was cancelled and a new design authorized on 20 October 1967. The insignia was amended to revise the description and symbolism on 8 June 1992.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Per chevron reversed Tenné and Sable, issuant in base between two fountains a splice of three wires spread at fess point per chevron reversed and per pale throughout, in chief issuant from fess point two flashes point to chief Argent.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors, Argent and Tenné, a roundel per pale Azure and Gules charged with a mullet of the first between the handles of two barongs saltirewise Proper all surmounting a panache of three varieties of Bird of paradise distinguishing feathers Or and Azure.

Motto

SPIRIT SPEED STRENGTH.

Symbolism

Shield

Orange and white are colors traditionally associated with the Signal Corps. The two fountains (white and blue wavy discs) in base denote the unit's participation in two Pacific campaigns during World War II. The spliced wires suggest the Battalion's particular function of cable construction, and crossing the black into the bright orange signifies the light of information brought by communications. The two flashes are representative of signals.

Crest

The barong, a long knife of the Moros, a native people of the Philippines, and the feathers of the Bird of Paradise, a species indigenous to New Guinea, represent the unit's World War II campaign participation in Luzon and New Guinea. The star and the red and blue areas of the roundel refer to the Meritorious Unit Commendation, and the Presidential Unit Citation, the unit's two decorations.

Background
A coat of arms was approved on 20 November 1941. That design was cancelled and a new design for the coat of arms was authorized on 24 August 1967. It was amended to add a crest on 23 May 1979. The coat of arms was amended to revise the blazon and symbolism on 8 June 1992.





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