417TH REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, the statue of Nathan Hale (Karl Gerhardt, sculptor, in the State Capitol at Hartford, Connecticut) affronté Argent. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "SPIRIT OF '76" in Blue letters.

Symbolism
The shield is blue for Infantry. Nathan Hale was born in Coventry in 1755, graduated from Yale University in 1773, and died in New York in 1776. He truly represented the highest type of patriotism and "The Spirit of '76." He was a citizen as distinguished from a professional soldier, was a volunteer in the revolutionary cause and gave to it his last drop of blood with a patriotism and zeal unequaled. His last words could well be chosen and have been so considered from the time of his death as the highest ideal of a citizen and soldier: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 417th Regiment Infantry, Organized Reserves on 13 May 1927. It was redesignated for the 417th Regiment on 10 June 1960.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Azure, the statue of Nathan Hale (Karl Gerhardt, sculptor, in the Sate Capitol at Hartford, Connecticut) affronté Argent.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Argent and Azure, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

SPIRIT OF '76.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is blue for Infantry. Nathan Hale was born in Coventry in 1755, graduated from Yale University in 1773, and died in New York in 1776. He truly represented the highest type of patriotism and "The Spirit of '76." He was a citizen as distinguished from a professional soldier, was a volunteer in the revolutionary cause and gave to it his last drop of blood with a patriotism and zeal unequaled. His last words could well be chosen and have been so considered from the time of his death as the highest ideal of a citizen and soldier: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."

Crest

The crest is that of the U.S. Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 417th Regiment Infantry, Organized Reserves on 13 May 1927. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 20 December 1932. The coat of arms was redesignated for the 417th Regiment on 10 June 1960.





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