357TH REGIMENT
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, a chevron rompu point debased Argent between in chief a plate charged with a monogrammed "OT" of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 90th Division Proper and in base two mullets of the second. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "SIEMPRE ALERTA" in Black letters.

Symbolism
The shield is blue, the Infantry color. The broken rompu point debased chevron indicates that the regiment pushed the German salient back at the Bois de Bantheville and Grand Carré Farm. The shoulder sleeve insignia indicates that the 357th Infantry was a unit of the 90th Division, the unit's former assignment. The two mullets (stars) represent the two major operations during World War I, as well as the dual source of the personnel. The motto translates to "Always On Alert."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 357th Infantry Regiment, Organized Reserves on 8 September 1927. It was amended to withdraw "Organized Reserves" from the designation on 16 June 1959. The insignia was redesignated for the 357th Regiment with the description updated on 8 July 1999.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Azure, a chevron rompu point debased Argent between in chief a plate charged with the monogrammed "OT" of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 90th Division Proper and in base two mullets of the second.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Argent and Azure, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

SIEMPRE ALERTA (Always on Alert).

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is blue, the Infantry color. The broken rompu point debased chevron indicates that the regiment pushed the German salient back at the Bois de Bantheville and Grand Carré Farm. The shoulder sleeve insignia indicates that the 357th Infantry was a unit of the 90th Division, the unit's former assignment. The two mullets (stars) represent the two major operations during World War I, as well as the dual source of the personnel.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 357th Infantry Regiment, Organized Reserves on 19 June 1925. It was amended to withdraw "Organized Reserves" from the designation and to delete the Organized Reserves' crest from the coat of arms on 16 June 1959. The insignia was amended to reinstate the crest of the Army Reserve on 7 August 1970. It was redesignated for the 357th Regiment on 8 July 1999.





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