779TH ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall blazoned as follows: Gules, a castle of three towers conjoined Argent (Silver Gray), masoned Sable, the centre tower larger and bearing an escutcheon Tenné emitting flames from dexter and sinister of the first, charged with a barrulet surmounted by a pallet of the second, in dexter chief a mullet of seven of the last. Attached below a Black scroll inscribed "JUSTITIUM TENE NIHIL TIMEO" in Silver.

Symbolism
Scarlet is the color traditionally associated with Engineer units. The masoned castle indicates the unit's affiliation to the Engineer branch. The orange shield denotes the Battalion headquarters, alluding to the 779th Engineer Battalion's lineage as a Signal unit. The barrulet suggests the horizontal construction company; the pallet refers to the vertical construction company. The white seven-pointed star, as displayed on the flag of Australia, alludes to the unit's activation during World War II in that country. The flames represent the sapper company within the Battalion. The motto translates to "Do Right, Fear Nothing."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 13 January 2009.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gules, upon a base barry wavy Azure and Argent, a castle of three towers conjoined of the last, masoned Sable, the centre tower larger and bearing an escutcheon Tenné edged of the second, emitting flames from dexter and sinister Proper, charged with a barrulet surmounted by a pallet of the second, in dexter chief a mullet of seven of the last.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Florida Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Gules, an alligator statant Proper.

Motto

JUSTITIUM TENE NIHIL TIMEO (Do Right, Fear Nothing).

Symbolism

Shield

Scarlet and white are the colors traditionally associated with Engineer units. The masoned castle indicates the unit's affiliation to the Engineer branch. The orange shield denotes the Battalion headquarters, alluding to the 779th Engineer Battalion's lineage as a Signal unit. The barrulet suggests the horizontal construction company; the pallet refers to the vertical construction company. The white seven-pointed star, as displayed on the flag of Australia, alludes to the unit's activation during World War II in that country. The flames represent the sapper company within the Battalion. The wavy base suggests the location of Florida's Joint Force Headquarters in Saint Augustine, Florida.

Crest

The crest is that of the Florida Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 13 January 2009.





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