458TH ENGINEER BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Argent, a lion rampant double queued Gules, armed and langued Sable, and a fess archy counterchanged, in base a battle-axe fesswise of the last. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "NEVER SO MUCH ? BY SO FEW" in Black letters.

Symbolism
The shield is in the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The lion, taken from the arms of St. Vith (Belgium) where the German-Ardennes offensive was stopped, symbolizes the Ardennes-Alsace campaign. The fess archy represents the Ludendorff Bridge crossing the Rhine at Remagen. The successful crossing of the bridge by the American forces was of the greatest importance in the invasion of Germany and was the initial step in the Rhineland campaign. The battle-axe, a favorite Teutonic weapon and heraldic charge throughout the medieval period, represents the organization's Central Europe campaign.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 16 September 1954.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Argent, a lion rampant double queued Gules, armed and langued Sable, and a fess archy counterchanged, in base a battle-axe fesswise of the last.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

NEVER SO MUCH ? BY SO FEW.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is in the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The lion, taken from the arms of St. Vith (Belgium) where the German-Ardennes offensive was stopped, symbolizes the Ardennes-Alsace campaign. The fess archy represents the Ludendorff Bridge crossing the Rhine at Remagen. The successful crossing of the bridge by the American forces was of the greatest importance in the invasion of Germany and was the initial step in the Rhineland campaign. The battle-axe, a favorite Teutonic weapon and heraldic charge throughout the medieval period, represents the organization's Central Europe campaign.

Crest

The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 16 September 1954.





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