457TH CHEMICAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/16 inches (2.70 cm) in height overall consisting of a white smoke ring with a blue hexagon surmounted and extended over the base all in front of gold rays radiating from the central area of the smoke ring and extending to a blue scroll arched over the top and the ends terminating in base at each side of the hexagon, inscribed at the top "COVER THE ATTACK" in gold letters.

Symbolism
The colors cobalt blue and golden yellow (gold) are used for the Chemical Corps. The hexagon alludes to the chemical symbol for a benzene ring. The smoke ring refers to the Battalion's chemical smoke generator mission; together with the encircling scroll it connotes the unit's motto and the capability for providing concealment of troops and installations under operating conditions by use of smoke. The rays radiating from the smoke ring signify the Battalion's mobility in providing overall protective cover.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 24 February 1970.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gyronny of sixteen Or and Tenné, a hexagon Azure charged with a wreath of smoke Argent.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Tenné, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto

COVER THE ATTACK.

Symbolism

Shield

The colors cobalt blue and golden yellow are used for the Chemical Corps. The hexagon alludes to the chemical symbol for a benzene ring. The smoke ring refers to the Battalion's chemical smoke generator mission and recalls the unit's motto, "Cover the Attack," and the capability for providing concealment of troops. The rays radiating from the hexagon signify the Battalion's mobility in providing overall protective cover.

Crest

The crest is that of the U.S. Army Reserve.

Background
The coat of arms was approved on 19 November 1996.





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