151ST CHEMICAL BATTALION
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Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 inch (2.54 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, a pale wavy Argent, a grapevine leafed per bend wavy counterchanged, in sinister chief a winged spur of the second. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "GET THERE FIRST" in Black letters.

Symbolism
The shield is in the colors for the Corps of Engineers, the unit's original designation. The arms are based on local history. When General Nathan Bedford Forrest of the Confederate Army was in pursuit of Colonel Abel D. Streight in Streight's Raid through North Alabama, in the last days of the pursuit, Colonel Streight burned a bridge near Gaylesville in Cherokee County, Alabama. When General Forrest reached the site of the bridge the method of pulling the cannons and empty caissons over the river was by the use of ropes and grapevines. This historical fact may well be perpetuated in the coat of arms of the Battalion as a fitting example to them of how a difficulty may be overcome. The winged spur signifies that the unit is mounted. The motto is said to have originated with General Forrest, who is claimed to have said: Git That Furs'est with the Mostest Men."

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 127th Engineer Battalion (Mounted) on 27 April 1926. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Regiment on 28 February 1942. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Battalion on 20 September 1944. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Battalion (Combat) (Army) on 7 June 1954. The insignia was redesignated on 1 August 2002, for the 151st Chemical Battalion, Alabama Army National Guard.




Coat of Arms


Description/Blazon

Shield

Gules, a pale wavy Argent, a grapevine leafed per bend wavy counterchanged, in sinister chief a winged spur of the second.

Crest

That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Alabama Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Gules, a slip of cotton plant with full bursting boll, Proper.

Motto

GET THERE FIRST.

Symbolism

Shield

The shield is in the colors for the Corps of Engineers, the unit's original designation. The arms are based on local history. When General Nathan Bedford Forrest of the Confederate Army was in pursuit of Colonel Abel D. Streight in Streight's Raid through North Alabama, in the last days of the pursuit, Colonel Streight burned a bridge near Gaylesville in Cherokee County, Alabama. When General Forrest reached the site of the bridge the method of pulling the cannons and empty caissons over the river was by the use of ropes and grapevines. This historical fact may well be perpetuated in the coat of arms of the Battalion as a fitting example to them of how a difficulty may be overcome. The winged spur signifies that the unit is mounted. The motto is said to have originated with General Forrest, who is claimed to have said: Git That Furs'est with the Mostest Men."

Crest

The crest is that of the Alabama Army National Guard.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 127th Engineer Battalion (Mounted) on 27 April 1926. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Regiment on 29 December 1941. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Battalion on 19 September 1944. It was redesignated for the 151st Engineer Battalion (Combat) (Army) on 7 June 1954. The insignia was redesignated on 1 August 2002, for the 151st Chemical Battalion, Alabama Army National Guard.





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