Campaign and Service Medals
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Army Good Conduct Medal


Description

A Bronze medal, 1 1/4 inches in diameter, with an eagle, wings spread, standing on a closed book and sword, encircled by the words “EFFICIENCY HONOR FIDELITY”. On the reverse is a five-pointed star and a scroll between the words “FOR GOOD” and “CONDUCT”, surrounded by a wreath formed by a laurel branch on the left and an oak branch on the right. Clasps are placed on the ribbon to represent subsequent awards.


Ribbon

A 1 3/8 inches ribbon consisting of the following stripes: 1/16 inch Soldier Red 67157; 1/16 inch White 67101; 1/16 inch Soldier Red; 1/16 inch White; 1/16 inch Soldier Red; 1/16 inch White; center 5/8 inch Soldier Red; 1/16 inch White; 1/16 inch Soldier Red; 1/16 inch White; 1/16 inch Soldier Red; 1/16 inch White; and 1/16 inch Soldier Red.


Criteria

See Army Regulation 600-8-22, Military Awards.


Components

The following are authorized components:

a. Medal (regular size): MIL-DTL-3943/191. NSN 8455-00-269-5761 for set which includes regular size medal and ribbon bar.

b. Medal (miniature size): MIL-DTL-3943/191. Commercially available from certified manufacturers.

c. Ribbon: MIL-DTL-11589/68. NSN 8455-00-257-0571. Commercially available from certified manufacturers.

d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon): MIL-DTL-11484/48. Commercially available from certified manufacturers.


Background

a. The Good Conduct Medal was established by Executive Order 8809, dated 28 June 1941, and authorized the award for soldiers completing three years active service after that date. The criteria was amended by Executive Order 9323, dated 31 March 1943, to authorize award for three years service after 7 December 1941 or one year service while the United States is at war. Executive Order 10444, dated 10 April 1953, revised the criteria to authorize award for three years service after 27 August 1940; one year service after 7 December 1941 while the United States is at war; and award for the first award for service after 27 June 1950 upon termination of service, for periods less than three years, but more than one year.

b. The medal was designed by Mr. Joseph Kiselewski and approved by the Secretary of War on 30 October 1942. The eagle, with wings spread, denotes vigilance and superiority. The horizontal sword denotes loyalty, and the book represents knowledge acquired and ability gained. On the reverse, the lone star denotes merit. The wreath of laurel and oak leaves denotes reward and strength.

c. The second and subsequent awards are indicated by the wear of the clasp with loop on the ribbon. Bronze clasps indicate the second (two loops) through fifth award (five loops); silver clasps indicate sixth (one loop) through tenth award (five loops); and gold clasps indicate eleventh (one loop) through the fifteenth award (5 loops).






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