CAPITAL MILITARY ASSISTANCE COMMAND
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Shoulder Sleeve Insignia


Description/Blazon
On a hexagon 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height, the vertical sides 1 13/16 inches (4.60 cm) in length, divided saltirewise into two unequal ultramarine blue areas and two equal scarlet areas, the saltire division lines issuing from the two lower corresponding angles of the hexagon and intersecting 7/8 inch (2.22 cm) from the upper angle, a vertical unsheathed Crusader's sword, point up, with white blade and yellow hilt, between in base two white five-pointed stars (of a size inscribed in a circle 5/8 inch (1.59 cm) in diameter) one point up, the vertical axis of each star coinciding with the saltire division lines and the center of each star 13/16 inch (2.06 cm) from the two lower corresponding angles all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) white border.

Symbolism
The Crusader's sword point up, with white blade and yellow hilt appears on both the shoulder sleeve insignia of the United States Army Vietnam (on an ultramarine blue base) and of the United States Military Assistance Command Vietnam (on a scarlet base). The sword, a symbol of strength and courage, refers in this instance to the Capital Military Assistance Command and with the ultramarine blue and scarlet base provides the link with USARV and USMACV as the superior headquarters. The white five-pointed star is a United States symbol and is also si8milar to that of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam; the two stars placed on either side of the guard of the unsheathed sword refer to the constant and combined efforts of the United States and the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in protecting Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam. The scarlet color also represents the Artillery which provides surveillance and counter measures against enemy rockets and mortar attacks, the blue color referring to the Infantry which continually patrols in and near Saigon to prevent enemy infiltration and ground attack.

Background
The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 29 July 1969. It was cancelled effective 1 April 1970. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-523)





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