5TH SURGICAL HOSPITAL
Skip Navigation Links.
Distinctive Unit Insignia


Description/Blazon
A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of five white demi-fleurs-de-lis their central petals forming spearheads four in blue and one pointing up in maroon, all conjoined to form a circle at center containing a five-armed maroon cross, the whole on a radiant gold background and enclosed at sides and bottom by a curving maroon scroll inscribed in gold with the words "LIBERTY THROUGH LIFE."

Symbolism
White and maroon are the colors used by the Army Medical Department. The five fleurs-de-lis with central petals formed like spearheads relate to the Hospital's wartime service (the four blue points representing campaigns in France during World War I and the total of five points representing World War II service in France and Central Europe). The five-armed cross at center represents the Hospital's numerical designation and refers to the symbolical significance of the number five, that of healing, inspiration and life, the five senses and the five digits of each hand and foot. The cross at center, together with the spearheads pointing outward from it, refers to the Hospital's function of collection of the wounded, dispensing emergency treatment and passage to the rear for further medical attention.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 5th Evacuation Hospital on 21 November 1969. It was redesignated for the 5th Combat Support Hospital on 11 July 1972. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 April 1982, for the 5th Surgical Hospital.





Jump to Top